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Gut-on-a-chip: Current progress and future opportunities

Ashammakhi, N ; Sharif University of Technology | 2020

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  1. Type of Document: Article
  2. DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2020.120196
  3. Publisher: Elsevier Ltd , 2020
  4. Abstract:
  5. Organ-on-a-chip technology tries to mimic the complexity of native tissues in vitro. Important progress has recently been made in using this technology to study the gut with and without microbiota. These in vitro models can serve as an alternative to animal models for studying physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. While these models have greater physiological relevance than two-dimensional (2D) cell systems in vitro, endocrine and immunological functions in gut-on-a-chip models are still poorly represented. Furthermore, the construction of complex models, in which different cell types and structures interact, remains a challenge. Generally, gut-on-a-chip models have the potential to advance our understanding of the basic interactions found within the gut and lay the foundation for future applications in understanding pathophysiology, developing drugs, and personalizing medical treatments. © 2020
  6. Keywords:
  7. Gut ; Microfluidics ; Microphysiological systems ; Organ-on-a-chip ; Tissue engineering ; Physiology ; Chip technology ; Complex model ; Future applications ; Immunological functions ; In-vitro models ; Medical treatment ; Pathophysiology ; Two Dimensional (2 D) ; Physiological models ; Dimeticone ; Glass ; Poly(methyl methacrylate) ; Polycarbonate ; Polyester ; Dysbiosis ; Equipment design ; Escherichia coli ; Human ; Hydrophobicity ; Innate immunity ; Intestine cell ; Intestine flora ; Microfluidics ; Microtechnology ; Nonhuman ; Personalized medicine ; Porosity ; Priority journal ; Review ; Shear stress ; Transepithelial resistance ; Vascular endothelial cell
  8. Source: Biomaterials ; Volume 255 , 2020
  9. URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0142961220304427